Kids Need Families and Families Need Support

Adoption Myth #5

"Older children can't be or don't want to be adopted."

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Adoption Blog

5 Tips for a Healthy FunWalk Campaign!

 Jar labelled

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Now that you've registered (if you haven't yet you can click the register button above) it's time to start collecting pledges! We know that fundraising can be intimidating, so we want to help you out! Here are some tips and ideas to help get you on your way to meeting your goals!

  • Start by pledging to yourself
  • Set a reasonable goal
    Start simple, set a goal to raise $200 - $500. When you reach that goal you can always up it!
  • Tell a story
    Not all of us are comfortable asking for money, try starting a conversation about the ACO and how adoption and/or our work has affected you!
  • Send personalized emails
    Social media is a fun way to keep in touch – but the personalized ask will have the biggest impact.
  • Share your progress
    Regular updates will actively involve your supporters and encourage donations!

You can do all this and more by logging into your personal fundraising page. To login, click here.

Who should I ask for donations?

Ask anyone! Start with friends and family, move to co-workers and neighbors. Spread the word with members of your clubs, groups, religious and community centers. Don’t leave out the kids, ask your kids’ sports teams to pool all their pocket change for a donation!

Why should I support FunWalk?

Did you know there are currently 6000 children without permanent families in the foster care system? Learn more about how Everything Changes with a Forever Family


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If you would like to be a guest blogger, please contact us at info@adoption.on.ca.

Posted: July 22, 2016 at 07:04 AM
By: Communications Coordinator
(0) Comment/s | Categories: Events FunWalk Opportunities to Give
Will This Be The Summer of Your Self Care? | Parent Blogger

Written by: Woman of Many Hats

No more school bells to race for, lunches to make, homework to finish, and clothes and uniforms to have ready for school or that extracurricular activity. And what about those last minute requests for home baked cookies or brownies for some kind of school function or fundraiser?  Wait!  Is this list for the kids or the parents? I think you know. School can be stressful for children and youth, but it is also true for parents. Draining and worrisome for all parents, but especially those who juggle work and children.  It can be even harder for the single parent, or the parent who is caring for children and their own aging parents.  And let's not forget that parent who stays at home to tend to children, but who may never get a break from dealing with challenging behaviours or special needs. That can feel very lonesome too.

So... Once those school bells start ringing again and the mad morning dash begins in just 8 weeks or so, "What is going to be different"?  Will this be the summer that you begin to pay attention to yourself too?

The psychological shift in becoming a parent is huge; from being responsible for oneself only to being responsible for a child are worlds apart. 

Before I became a parent "my house" was in pretty good shape, and so was I. Despite having a very, very busy and stressful job, I found time to tend to my physical being, my emotional /relational self, and my creative/spiritual interests or callings. I used to sleep more; I could eat and drink more of what I wanted; I could always find time to read a good book; travel and explore; go to a concert or the movies (and see a film that I wanted, which tended not to have a cartoon as the main character!); talk to friends and family without interruption and about grander topics than just schedules and family life. I certainly had more expendable income, too. Ah, those were the days! 

I thought life was challenging then. And it was, but not in the same way that parenting is challenging. Although I knew becoming a parent would be difficult at times, it was something I was ready to take on and do well. Not perfect, but well. The psychological shift in becoming a parent is huge; from being responsible for oneself only to being responsible for a child are worlds apart. Little did I know how much of myself would go into parenting. Each and every day. There are some moments that I wonder how much of "me" is left at the end of the day.  Where did the rest of "me" go?  When is it coming back?  Sometimes I feel she is buried under the baskets of laundry in the living room waiting to be folded.  Sometimes she is in the dishwasher, waiting to be emptied and refilled. Sometimes she is lost on the "to do" list for me and my spouse. Sometimes she is hung on the wall, next to the two dusty guitars, or the three piles of to-be-read novels by the bedside table. Or even on the "my list" section of the next Netflix series that I am waiting to binge watch.  

But most days she is waiting patiently to be recognized and acknowledged and asked to come out to play. These days I pay less attention to my former self and more attention to my new self.  The self that is more concerned about doing the best job as opposed to a perfect job. The self that has built a family based on love, differences and acceptance. One that is centred around effort, not outcome. The self that focuses on changing previous maladaptive patterns; for kids and adults. One that sees the beauty in differences and explores histories and futures. One that strives to walk the "high road", which is often the road less travelled for many people these days, but, I find, it has the much better view and is worth the extra effort to get there. A self who is based on doing things the right and kind way, not simply the easy way. A self who would rather have a family of forgiveness for all the flaws exhibited and hidden, able to find our own strengths in being individuals and achieving our goals, both big and small.

It is true that I may never see my former self again and be able to give her all the attention she deserves and craves from time to time, but most days I prefer my new self.  Imperfections and all. Bags under my eyes, more grey hair than ever before (hidden under my natural colour, of course!) and "curvier" than my younger years.  But, this is a more evolved person and one who strives to continue living, learning and loving. Including myself a little more each day.

I plan on this being my summer of self care. But it will just be the beginning of another leg in the journey.  Where will your personal journey take you this summer?  Summer has officially arrived; school is out and the weather is lovely. Are you going to invite yourself out to play?


More from Woman of Many Hats

Packing for NACAC; What Hat to Wear? 

As I began preparation for the trip from T.O. to K.C., I reminded myself that I would not just be packing clothes, daily necessities and a good book for the 5 days in the U.S.  My first NACAC last year, in my home city, reminded me that there was more to this conference than just information; there was emotion too. While all conferences can be mentally tiring, I feel that NACAC is different. Read more...


International Self Care Day

July 24th is International Self Care Day, how do you take care of yourself? Tell us on Facebook, Twitter, or in the comment section below!


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Posted: July 8, 2016 at 08:00 AM
By: Communications Coordinator
(0) Comment/s | Categories: Adoption Support Guest Blogger Parent Perspective
Why FunWalk? Because Everything Changes with a Forever Family

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Everything Changes with a Forever Family

We know that a “forever family” can be the greatest single factor in ensuring a child’s health, wellbeing, and potential for success. Adoption provides a lifetime of benefits for children who are not living with their family of origin.

Consider this family’s story.

FunWalk participants have an unprecedented opportunity to truly make a difference today and into the future because everything changes with a forever family. ACO’s programs, with your support, yield positive outcomes for children, their families, and society!

Learn more about ACO’s Impact, click here.

Make an impact at FunWalk this year

FunWalk Event Details 

When: Sunday, September 18th 11 – 3PM
Where: Riverdale Park West, Toronto, ON.

For more infomration about FunWalk, click here


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If you would like to be a guest blogger, please contact us at info@adoption.on.ca.

Posted: July 7, 2016 at 08:00 AM
By: Communications Coordinator
(0) Comment/s | Categories: Events FunWalk Opportunities to Give
Connections Through Camping - Youth Network Family Event

Written by: Kimberley Miller, Permanency and Adoption Support Services 

What a difference a year makes; from one night to two and from the pouring rain to the hot blazing sun. June 24 to 26, 2016 marked the second annual camping trip for Youth Network Group members and their families, held at Earl Rowe Provincial Park. This gathering was initiated by the Simcoe County Adoption Connections Youth Group last year as a way to bring together Youth with an adoption or permanence experience and their families with others of similar make up.  Last year there were 33 people, this year 59. 

What was most remarkable to me were the connections that were made; by the youth from three different areas (Simcoe, GTA and London); by the parents and other adult relatives; and between older youth and younger children. It was a wonderful weekend to be a part of and to witness; as older youth took on roles of leadership and responsibility for younger children and teens. The word adoption was rarely used, if ever, throughout the weekend. It was not necessary. It did not matter, and yet it does matter. 

There was no one there to ask “Are all these your children?” to a multiracial family. There was no one there to ask “Which child is adopted?” to a family of both biological and adopted children.  There was no one to judge when one child stuck to the adults rather than play with the other children. There was no one to ask a child or youth “Why did your real parents give you away?”  There was comradery and fun; whether that was the children, youth and young adults playing “Capture the Flag”, “Manhunt” and water balloon games; or whether it was the adults who got a chance to talk, laugh and connect with other parents and enjoy watching their kids be kids. They could be just that. Kids. They did not have to worry about being found out or explaining their story. There was a real and palpable sense of “community” during this weekend.

Each family shared something (chips and dip, frozen raspberries, marshmallows, homemade muffins, Portuguese pastries, vats of Tim Horton’s coffee and let’s not forget the popsicles! Oh those popsicles that were so appreciated by kids and adults alike.)

They, in turn received something too; a sense of being understood and accepted. A relief of not having to explain their child and families dynamics. Some fun and laughter together and individually. Parents have already started wondering about how big it will be next year and plan on coming again. The youth are looking forward to the next event where they can see their old and new friends again and feel that same sense of acceptance and friendship.

A big thanks goes out to all of the organizers of the event, but an even bigger thank you goes out to the leaders of the Youth Networks, who showed real leadership during the weekend and a commitment to connect with kids. You should be very proud of yourselves. 

Until next year!


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Posted: July 4, 2016 at 12:07 PM
By: Communications Coordinator
(1) Comment/s | Categories: Events Youth Network
Love, Loss, and Longing: Stories of Adoption by Carol Shipley

Updated Edition with Birth Father Revelations

Written by Carol Shipley 

From the unique perspective of an adoptee, adoptive mother and adoption professional, I wrote “Love, Loss, and Longing: Stories of Adoption” in 2013. Compelled to write this book after I met my birth mother after a half century of longing to know my origins, the two parts of my story—before adoption placement and after—came together. I recount my own healing story of search and reunion as well as the story of my adoptive daughter whose moving reunion with her birth family freed her to embrace her First Nations heritage. I tell  heart-wrenching and life-giving stories of birth mothers as well as the stories of adoptive parents whose tenacity and hope that overpowers despair.

Blending photos and stories with current adoption theory and literature, I highlight the right of adoptees to know their origins, the benefits of open adoption, and the right of gays and lesbians to adopt. My book lends support for better adoption practices and  legislation in the future. It is all about people inside the adoption circle who express generous love for each other in unique ways.

As a result of publicity surrounding this book, I found family members on my birth father’s side. My husband and I and two of our adult children travelled to a hamlet in B.C.— to Yahk and back —to meet them. Again, I felt compelled to write about the search, and the “find.” I learned about the man my birth father was, and addressed the negative birth father stereotype by referencing my work with birth fathers and weaving in relevant bits of adoption literature.  I’ve created two genograms to help you figure out who’s who. The book concludes with a letter of gratitude to my adoptive dad who died as I was approaching adulthood. 

About the updated edition of my book, my colleague, Linda Corsini writes, “Your book is a much-needed resource concerning the often missing perspective of birth fathers. I believe it will be a genuine contribution to our adoption literature base. The voice of birth fathers is often not heard—hopefully the new edition of your book will close that gap!” 

Visit my website at http://carolshipleyadoptionstories.weebly.com if you’d like to buy a copy or two of the new book. It’s $25 plus shipping.

A final word: Some of us in Canada have written books and articles about adoption, but I encourage those of you who haven't to share your wealth of knowledge, expertise and conviction about the way to do adoption. There is life after retirement—write a book!


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If you would like to be a guest blogger, please contact us at info@adoption.on.ca.

Posted: July 1, 2016 at 07:00 AM
By: Communications Coordinator
(0) Comment/s | Categories: Adoptees Adoption in the News Guest Blogger Parent Perspective

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