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Adoption Myth #5

"Older children can't be or don't want to be adopted."

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ACO Ottawa Education Day Spring 2018 Workshops

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At registration, please choose one workshop for the morning session and one workshop for the afternoon session. 

Morning (10:30AM - 11:45AM)

Developmental Trauma & the Seven Core Issues: Parenting through a Trauma-informed Lens 

Learn how developmental trauma impacts the brain and derails development. Specifically, learn how these impacts in development often manifest in behaviours related to the seven core issues in adoption, and how to identify, translate and respond to children's needs through a trauma-informed lens that fosters attachment and supports development.  

Facilitator(s): Tiffany Peterson
I am a registered social worker with extensive experience working with diverse children, youth, and families in the child welfare, mental health, and youth criminal justice systems. Currently I am working as a clinician at the Ottawa Centre for Resilience (OCFR), Ottawa's only specialized psychology practice for childhood trauma, attachment, and adoption. At OCFR we are especially adept at working with hard to engage, high-risk children, youth, and families. I specialize in disruptive behaviours, self-regulation, attachment, and sexual behaviour issues related to histories of adverse childhood experiences, complex developmental trauma, adoption related issues, FASD and involvement with the child welfare and/or criminal justice systems.  

For: Adoptive/kinship/customary care families  

Social Media & Openness in Adoption: The Best Defense is a Good Offence

When it comes to ‘untangling the web’ the best defence is a good offence. This workshop will look at how parents can prepare for the realities of openness in adoption in a world of social media by learning about the internet and openly addressing their children’s interest in learning more about their birth families of origin.  

Facilitator(s): Pat Convery
Pat Convery is a Social Worker and has worked in adoption and child welfare practice since 1975. In 2007, Pat became the Executive Director of the Adoption Council of Ontario. In her role with the ACO Pat is able to direct her passion and energy toward the critical work of connecting Ontario families with waiting children and supporting the lifelong connections that are made through adoption.

For: Adoptive/kinship/customary care families

Successful Strategies for Raising Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a permanent brain injury that can cause lifelong challenges. The best protective factor for those living with it is a stable, nurturing home. The Fetal Alcohol Resource Program team will share current FASD information and proven strategies for supporting the potential brain impairments.  

Facilitator(s): Nancy Lockwood, Janet Carioni & Maude Champagne
Presenters Nancy Lockwood, Janet Carioni and Maude Champagne run the Fetal Alcohol Resource Program (FARP) at Citizen Advocacy Ottawa, where they have provided customized FASD education workshops to over 3000 professionals and agency staff, and responded to hundreds of requests for system navigation to informed supports by individuals with FASD and their families. All three are raising adopted children with brain based disabilities.

Nancy Lockwood is the Program Manager. Through extensive training and experience, Nancy has developed a specialty in supporting, educating and advocating for individuals affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, including advocacy at the provincial and national level. Nancy is a member of the FASD Coalition of Ottawa; is a founding member of Ottawa’s FASD Enrichment Fund; and assists the FASD Group of Ottawa with their programming.

Janet Carioni has her Master of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy. She was on the Waterloo Region FASD multi-disciplinary diagnostic team and consulted to the FASD classroom. In addition to Janet’s clinical experience, she has been involved in research projects related to sleep and FASD. She has lectured on the subject at international and regional conferences. In her private practice, Janet provides OT support to individuals living with traumatic brain injuries.

Bilingual FASD Coordinator Maude Champagne has degrees in both Special Education and Social Work. Maude was a team leader for British Columbia's ground breaking FASD Key Worker program at Lutherwood Mental Health Services, supporting individuals with FASD, birth parents and adoptive parents. Maude has developed a strong collaboration with the Ottawa chapter of Adopt 4 Life, and co-facilitates a monthly FASD focused parent support group with them.  

For: Pre-adoptive parents, Adoptive/kinship/customary care families

Value of Digital Storytelling for Youth in and from Care

This workshop will discuss digital stories that youth have created to illustrate messages about their need to belong, the importance of permanency, and what it’s like to grow up in foster care. Learn how to facilitate a digital storytelling workshop and how to use personal stories to explore identity and social inclusion, and as advocacy and knowledge-sharing tools.  

Facilitator(s): Adoption Council of Canada - Laura Eggertson & Tabitha McDonald
Executive Director Laura Eggertson, adopted from care in Winnipeg, MB, parents two youth adopted from Ontario CAS and is kinship care provider for three grandchildren. An award-winning journalist, she will supervise the project and co-facilitate YSO workshops.

Tabitha McDonald, 28, is a former Ontario Crown ward and Youth Speak Out Project Manager. She's an artist and training as a social worker.  

For: Professionals, kids/youth

 

Afternoon (2:30PM - 3:45PM)

Developmental Trauma & Ontario's new Developmental Trauma Action Alliance

Recent research has shown that adverse childhood experiences, particularly in the first 3 years of life, lead to profound adaptations in our brain and body.  While these adaptations are necessary for survival at the time they are made, they undermine normal development and become damaging patterns or “blueprints” that determine lifelong relationships, mental and physical health, learning, living and parenting.  We call this process and its impact Developmental Trauma. Too often Developmental Trauma goes unrecognized and unaddressed. Join us for a panel discussion about this critical issue and learn about Ontario's newly formed "Developmental Trauma Action Alliance".

Facilitator(s): DTAA Panel Presentation
A multi-sector collective formed to effect transformative, systemic change to improve the long-term outcomes and overall well-being of children, youth and adults who have experienced Developmental Trauma.

For: Adoptive/kinship/customary care families, professionals  

Family Rituals to Strengthen Connections & Increase Pleasure

The workshop aims to provide practical applications and strategies to participants to understand their child's needs through the lens of attachment and trauma and how to deliver care in a manner that their child can more easily accept and internalize. 

Participants will develop a basic understanding of the importance of attachment and connection in a child's development.

Participants will understand the negative impact of early trauma and loss on a child's ability to develop predominantly secure attachment styles and how to adapt parenting strategies and a parent's relationship for strengthening relationship, connection and healing.  

Facilitator(s): Sabrina Tripolitano
Sabrina is a mental health professional in private practice with particular expertise in the area of high conflict separation and divorce, child maltreatment issues, as well as working with foster and adoptive parents and their children. She provides counseling, consultation and assessment services. She is also a clinical investigator with the Office of the Children’s Lawyer and has been certified as an expert witness in her field. She is an experienced trainer.

For: Pre-adoptive parent, adoptive/kinship/customary care families

Positive Approaches to Openness

The workshop will focus on the ‘why’ and 'how to' of developing and managing positive relationship with birth family members after adoption. Focuses will include preparing for discussions about Openness prior to adoption and managing challenges and changes along the way.

Facilitator(s): Pat Convery
Pat Convery is a Social Worker and has worked in adoption and child welfare practice since 1975. In 2007, Pat became the Executive Director of the Adoption Council of Ontario. In her role with the ACO Pat is able to direct her passion and energy toward the critical work of connecting Ontario families with waiting children and supporting the lifelong connections that are made through adoption.

For: Pre-adoptive parent, adoptive/kinship/customary care families and professionals

Two Essential Concepts to Know for Attaching in Adoption: Window of Tolerance & Intimacy Barrier

This workshop will give participants a new lens through which to decode their children's behaviour by introducing two essential interpersonal neurobiology concepts: the window of tolerance and the intimacy barrier.  

Facilitator(s): Catherine Horvath
Dr. Horvath is a registered clinical and forensic psychologist and the Founder and Executive Director of the Ottawa Centre for Resilience (OCFR), Ottawa and surrounding area's only specialized mental health centre for childhood trauma & dissociation, attachment, adoption, and high-conflict families. Dr. Horvath and the clinicians at OCFR are specialized in working with those struggling with attachment, disruptive behaviours, self-regulation, and sexual behaviour issues related to histories of adverse childhood experiences, complex developmental trauma, adoption related issues, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, and involvement with the child welfare and/or criminal justice systems.  

For: Pre-adoptive parent, adoptive/kinship/customary care families and professionals

Youth Networks: Why They're Awesome & How to Build Them

Just as adoptive parents benefit from meeting other adoptive parents, adoptive youth also benefit from connecting with other youth on their adoption journey. The ability to support, anticpate, normalize and educate is of vital importance to the youth. This workshop will help those interested in creating Youth Networks in their communities.  

Facilitator(s): Brad Gibbons & Sylvia Gibbons
Brad is the Youth Liaison at the Adoption Council of Ontario. In this newly created role, Brad has been working with parents and community supports to build an Ontario wide Youth Network and provide youth with monthly meetings and opportunities to connect to one another. Brad recently completed a 3 year program at Georgian College and is now a Child and Youth Worker. He has been providing one to one support for adoptive families for several years in the Simcoe County area. As an adoptee, Brad is passionate about the importance of adoptive youth connecting to each other and normalizing their experiences of foster care and adoption.

Sylvia founded and runs a Support Group for Adoptive Families and founded and runs an Adopted Youth Group, both of which are in Simcoe County. She is the Adoption Council of Ontario’s PACT Parent Liaison. In this role she assists and guides Pathways parent groups to form ongoing parent support groups in their communities. Sylvia continues to provide peer support to many adoptive families throughout Ontario. Sylvia is also a trainer for the Adoption Council of Ontario where she trains parents in “Parenting Children Who Have Experienced Trauma and Loss’ and mental health and child welfare professionals in "Adoption Competent Training”. Sylvia has been a PRIDE trainer for ten years. Sylvia is also an adoptive parent.  

For: Adoptive/kinship/customary care families

Go back to the event listing.